Speech Therapy for Accent Modification

Learning English is challenging as a native speaker. The grammar rules and pronunciations are difficult enough to require lessons in every year of public education. For non-native speakers, who are accustomed to entirely different rules and pronunciations, it is far more difficult. To add to the difficulty of the language itself, foreign English speakers typically retain a noticeable accent that can make communication more difficult. It is also possible for people who have spoken English their entire lives to have a pronounced accent indicative of the region they were raised in. Read More

Free Online Resources for Teaching Your Kids at Home

As we all get used to this new normal, parents and teachers are faced with a question no one ever thought would need an answer. How do we keep our kids safe and practice social distancing while ensuring their education continues for the school year? So many parents are now juggling working from home and teaching their kids. And the reality is, those are the lucky ones because there are those who now find themselves looking for a job while trying to teach their kids. Whatever your situation, YOU ARE NOT ALONE! There are thousands of other parents in the same boat. To keep you from sinking, here are some resources we found online to help. 

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What’s the Difference Between Articulation and Phonological Disorders in Children?

Most young children go through a developmental phase in which they make phonetic errors in speech. You might remember your toddler or three-year-old substituting one sound for another, such as saying “weave” for “leave” or they leave out a consonant and restructure the word when two consonants are formed together at the beginning like, “boo” for “blue.”

While most articulation and phonology disorders are developmental, meaning that as they age they outgrow them, some articulation and phonology disorders are not. Read More

How Effective is One-on-One Speech Therapy for Older Children?

There are many resources available for preschool and elementary-age children who have developmental language disorder, a delay in mastering language skills in children who have no hearing loss or other developmental delays. But what about older children who still struggle with language mastery? Can one-on-one therapy still help those children? Read More

The Benefits of Using Telepractice for Speech Sound Disorders

As telepractice becomes more widely available as a method for serving individuals with communication impairments, family members may wonder if it is a good fit for their child. One of the most commonly-addressed conditions that is addressed through telepractice is the area of Speech Sound Disorders. Caretakers who are considering telepractice may ask, “What are the benefits of pursuing treatment through telepractice?” “Are there any limitations?”

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Activities to Improve Language Processing

Far too often we focus on the wrong things when treating Language Processing. We focus on the pronouns, the letter combination sounds, and sentence structure. Of course, these are important but before we jump into these skills first, we tend to lose sight of the need to treat language processing (LP) first. Nearly all of our activities are done through language. When processing skills are an issue, it’s hard for us to communicate what to do if we don’t understand what it is we’re doing or the tools we’re using. For instance, asking a student to paint a picture will result in frustration if they don’t know what a paintbrush is. Read More

Treating Auditory Processing Disorders is a Team Effort

Children who utter “Huh?” “What?” or appear to tune out are often regarded as having behavioral issues when in fact, it could be auditory processing disorder (APD). It’s through a concentrated effort on the part of many therapies that APD can be treated.

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Summer Travel and the Speech-Language Impaired Child

Nothing beats summer vacation and the chance to get out and travel. As a speech-language pathologist, you may have concerns regarding summer travel and the families you work with. Planning summer travel with a speech-impaired child can be difficult and the families you aid may have questions involving how to make traveling during the summer fun for everyone involved. With these tips, you can help ensure your students and their families have safe and fun summer trips. Read More

Summer Activities to Support Summer Learning

As we get closer to summer break, you might be scrambling to find ways to make sure your students retain as many of their new speech-language skills as possible. Unless your students qualify for extended school year services or have access to private speech therapy time with you during the summer months, the struggle to keep students from the summer slide is something educators and school therapists have been battling for years. Read More

Communication Techniques for the Non-Verbal Child

Everyone needs to communicate. The ability to communicate our needs and wants is essential to living a fulfilled life. It’s estimated that nearly 25% of people on the autism spectrum are non-verbal. Despite all the advances there have been in treating people on the autism spectrum, there is still much to be learned, especially with children. An important thing to remember that not all communication is verbal, even when that’s what our area of focus generally is. Read More

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