Benefits of Speech Therapy for Seniors

Speech therapy is often thought to be mainly used for young children developing their communication abilities. However, students and children are not the only ones that can greatly benefit from speech therapy. In this blog, we dive into why speech intervention for seniors is extremely important and effective in some instances.

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Speech Therapy for Accent Modification

Learning English is challenging as a native speaker. The grammar rules and pronunciations are difficult enough to require lessons in every year of public education. For non-native speakers, who are accustomed to entirely different rules and pronunciations, it is far more difficult. To add to the difficulty of the language itself, foreign English speakers typically retain a noticeable accent that can make communication more difficult. It is also possible for people who have spoken English their entire lives to have a pronounced accent indicative of the region they were raised in. Read More

Understanding the Benefits of Group Speech Therapy

Whether we realize it or not, our speech and social skills are closely linked. The ability to communicate effectively in a social setting is often overlooked but it’s a necessary skill for children to learn. Some children may have no issues playing, sharing, or communicating with classmates and teachers; while other children may have such a difficulty that it inhibits their ability to perform well academically and socially. Read More

How to Get Rid of a Lisp with Speech Therapy

It is not uncommon for children to have lisps. So for this blog we take a deep look at exactly what a lisp is, the different types of lisp, and how speech therapy can be an effective treatment.
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Teletherapy Activities & Strategies for Working with Preschoolers

As children enter school play needs to be an important part of the therapy process. This is especially true for preschoolers. Children at the preschool age are at the beginning of their school journey but are also learning how to balance structured activities with play.

Play keeps learning fun for preschoolers. Therapy sessions with preschoolers must consist of more than flashcards and worksheets. Whether your therapy sessions format is pull-out therapy, push-in therapy, or teletherapy, preschool speech therapy consists of a different style of activities than it does for older children. Read More

Using Boom Cards for Speech Therapy – Virtually & In-Person

In the ever-evolving world of speech therapy, therapists are continually looking for new innovations. Boom Cards are one such tool, providing speech therapists an effective way to engage students.

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Treating Anomic Aphasia with Speech Therapy

Anomic aphasia presents as an inability to consistently produce the appropriate words for things a person wishes to talk about. This is particularly evident when the individual requires a noun or a verb. The disorder is known by several names, including amnesic aphasia, dysnomia, and nominal aphasia. Read More

Anomic Aphasia: What is it? Causes & Treatment

Many people have never heard of anomic aphasia, and yet 180,000 people acquire it each year. When that many people are affected, we really should be talking about it more often. Our goal is to help you understand anomic aphasia and how to treat it.

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Schools Turn to Teleschool During COVID-19 Outbreak

The United States is currently faced with the challenge of preventing the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) while simultaneously maintaining the daily function and operation of a variety of large-scale operations. Travelers have been warned to proceed with caution or postpone any trips. Those that work in a corporate setting have been granted permission to work remotely to avoid further spread of the virus. School districts across the country are turning to teleschool, an increasingly popular technology that connects students with teachers, therapists, and other education professionals remotely. 

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How Speech Therapy is Evolving

The future of speech therapy is changing rapidly, as a result of many Baby Boomer speech-language pathologists (SLPs) reaching retirement, with a decreased number of new graduates available to take those vacancies. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics says there will be a 27% increase in jobs available in the field in the decade between 2018 and 2028. This translates to more than 153,700 new jobs in the field, but with just a year before the decade of growth closes, many jobs remain unfilled. Read More

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