5 Tips for School Leaders Preparing for the Upcoming School Year

Across the country, school leaders are preparing for the upcoming school year with new approaches. The last few years have been nothing short of challenging for the education industry with unpredictable circumstances, and many schools going in and out of virtual learning settings. As leaders prepare for this year, here are a few tips for success: 

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How Parents and Teachers Can Respond to Tragic Events 

In recent years, we have witnessed several tragic events that have shaken our nation to the core. The seeming frequency of these tragedies, both in and out of schools, makes it almost impossible to escape the constant intake of post-tragedy images such as those we see on television and social media. In light of recent events, the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) warned the public to avoid the “dangers of intrusive or excessive coverage” of these events.

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The Future of School Psychology: Post Pandemic Teletherapy in Schools

With the disruptions caused by COVID-19 almost behind us, the use of teletherapy will remain a critical service delivery model for providing school psychology services. Learn more in our article written by School Psychologist Dr. Pedro Olvera.

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IEP Meeting Tips for Parents

Your child’s IEP meeting can be a stressful moment for your family; however, it does not need to be.  As a parent or caregiver, you should see the IEP meeting as an opportunity to discuss all of your child’s needs and get professional recommendations on how to support them. It is also a great time to share their strengths and advocate for support in the school.

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Is a Psychoeducational Evaluation Right for Your Child?

You may have heard about psychoeducational evaluation before from an educator or another school professional. But what exactly is it and is it right for your child? Our in-depth guide will give you everything you need to know about these evaluations and if they are right for your child.

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Learning Through Play

Play is essential for learning at a young age. All of us learn through our early years of play that make learning easier as we age. The child who never engages in storytelling cannot develop their imagination and prepare themselves for excellent writing skills. The child who doesn’t sing and dance may have a harder time learning speech and remembering facts later on. Play has to be a part of a child’s day! You can use these techniques with your young patients during your sessions together and encourage parents to play with a purpose between sessions. Read More